Wild Whales News

A Mother’s Loss

How the death of newborn calf is showing the effects of a changing environment By Volunteer Writer Kathryn Gibb It should have been a cause for celebration.  On July 24, J35 (Tahlequah) - a member of the endangered Southern Resident killer whale population - gave...

The Plight of the Vaquita

By BCCSN Volunteer Writer, Kathryn Gibb First discovered in 1958, the vaquita (Phocoena sinus) is a small, shy species of porpoise residing solely in Mexico’s Gulf of California. At only 1.5m long, it is the world’s smallest species of cetacean. Though they inhabit...

eXXpedition: Women on a Mission for Science

By Kathryn Gibb, volunteer writer for the B.C. Cetacean Sightings Network.  On June 23rd, 2018, the female-led research group eXXpedition begins their 3,000 nautical mile voyage from Hawaii to the Pacific Coast. Their 72 foot sailboat, Sea Dragon, will be home to the...

Whales Need Beach Days Too!

Article By Kathryn Gibb, volunteer blogger with the BC Cetacean Sightings Network.  With summer upon us, we’ve traded in our flannel blankets for beach towels. Everyone loves a day at the beach: lather on the sunscreen, find a spot on the sand, and enjoy a...

The Great Humpback Migration

By this time of the year, many humpback whales (Megaptera novaengliae) have already started their impressively long migration south.  Those from the northern hemisphere travel from their summer feeding areas in temperate-cold waters to breed for the winter in...

2017: A Year in Review

In 2017 so far, the BC Cetacean Sightings Network has received sightings from over 6,000 volunteer observers. 2017 was the ‘Year of the Humpback’; 45% of all sightings reported this year were of humpback whales.  Researchers at the North Coast Cetacean Research...

It’s a Snotty Job, But Someone Has to Do it!

Being a whale researcher is not always the most glamourous job. Often scientists have to get dirty in order to collect the data they need to better understand whale populations. A team of marine mammal researchers, including the Marine Mammal Research Program’s own...

How Do We Save the Southern Residents?

What actions are needed to save the critically-endangered southern resident killer whale population? This was the main question that gathered scientists, government officials, industry, and First Nations in Vancouver, BC on October 11-12, 2017.  Led by the Government...

A Summer of North Coast Cetaceans

Each summer, our North Coast office hires summer students through the Canada Summer Jobs program to help with various projects related to cetacean research and conservation out of Prince Rupert, BC.  This year, Sarah Ducharme, a fourth year student at Vancouver Island...

Untangling Entanglements

Entanglement of whales in fishing gear has increasingly been in the news over the last several years, perhaps most memorably with the humpback that stranded in White Rock in 2012, entangled in plastic long line. On the B.C. coast the habitats of whales, dolphins and...